The Information Literacy Rubric was first developed by Angela Feekery, Lisa Emerson and Ken Kilpin as part of their 2013 TLRI funded project on the transition to tertiary learning.

The rubric is a form of self-reflection: students assess themselves on a four point scale (basic, emerging, proficient and advanced) on a series of items. As such, rather than being an objective measure of  students’ skills, aptitudes and behaviours, the rubric is a measure of student perceptions. It was designed as a tool which would enable students to assess their readiness for tertiary study, teachers to develop appropriate resources and curricula, and researchers to measure the success of teachers’ literacy strategies in terms of student preparedness for academic literacy. Its structure was designed to highlight key literacy competencies students entering higher education would be expected to develop through scaffolded instruction and independent learning experiences.

You and your students can access all of the sections of the Information Literacy rubric through the links below. Each section can be completed separately and in any order you wish.

It is only the rubric questions themselves that are available from this page and the answers you provide will not be recorded or analysed by the research team. You will not receive a automatic summary of your rubric score when you finish each section, but you can calculate your own average score on each section by following these instructions.

For each section:
Count the number of times you placed yourself in the Basic level.
Count the number of times you placed yourself in the Emerging level and multiply this number by 3.
Count the number of times you placed yourself in the Proficient level and multiply this number by 5.
Count the number of times you placed yourself in the Advanced level and multiply this number by 7.

Add theses four figures together, and divide by the number specified for each section below.

Complete the Finding Information section here. 

Calculating your Finding Information score: Do not count your responses to the question about who you ask for help. Divide the figure you identified by following the instructions above by 11. This gives you your average score on Finding information.

Complete the Evaluating Information section here

Calculating your Evaluating Information score: Divide the figure you identified by following the instructions above by 6. This gives you your average score on Evaluating Information.

Complete the Acknowledging Sources section here

Calculating your Acknowledging Sources score: Divide the figure you identified by following the instructions above by 5. This gives you your average score on Acknowledging Sources.

Complete the Using and Organising Information section here

Calculating your Using and Organising Information score: Divide the figure you identified by following the instructions above by 9. This gives you your average score on Using and Organising Information.

Complete the Reading and Writing Process section here

Calculating your Reading and Writing Process score: Divide the figure you identified by following the instructions above by 11. This gives you your average score on Reading and Writing Process.

Complete the Learning to Learn section here

Calculating your Learning to Learn score: Divide the figure you identified by following the instructions above by 9. This gives you your average score on Reading and Writing Process.

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